Can Dogs Eat Waffles? Blueberry, Eggo, or with Maple Syrup?

We all love waffles, right? It’s warm, delicious, soft… Sweet or sour… absolutely mouth-watering. But can we share its goodness with our dogs?

Milk, sugar, salt, baking powder, etc. all the components that are used in waffles are not harmful to your pet. Some dogs can’t digest the milk though, so in that case, it is not suitable for your pup.

However, the waffles have sugar, and much more than it’s considered to be healthy for your pet. So let’s try to dig deeper. 

Are you interested in a particular question? Then use the table of contents below to jump to the most relevant section. And you can always go back by clicking on the black arrow in the right bottom corner of the page. Also, please note that some of the links in this article may be affiliate links. For more details, check the Disclosure section at the bottom of the page. 

Are waffles good for dogs?

Waffles are not harmful, and after eating it, the dog will never deal with any side effects, but only if you only shared a tiny piece of the treat. More substantial portions might put your pet in danger. High in sugars, carbs, and fats treats similar to waffles should have never become a staple of your pet’s diet. 

Can dogs eat Eggo waffles?

Let’s have a look at some facts. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and their food database, 100g of Homestyle Eggo waffles contains 6.1g of protein, 39.1g of carbs, 8.7g of fats (including 2.2 of “bad” saturated and even 0.2g of trans fats).

It also has 10 mg of cholesterol and 509mg of Sodium, which is way too high for your pup. So, at the very least, it’s not the healthiest dog food ever.

But at the end of the day It’s up to you. If you train your dog to eat everything, then your dog might eat it. But waffles, including Eggo, are not recommended to eat regularly since those are high in “bad” fats and Sodium. 

Can dogs eat blueberry waffles?

Blueberry might seem like a healthier option. After all, these berries have tons of fiber and antioxidants. But overall, these types of waffles have similar effects to your pet’s body as any others. 100 g serving of those contains 271 calories, 5.71g of protein, 41.43 carbs (including about 17g of sugar), 486mg of Sodium, and 10g of fats (2.14g are saturated). 

So, yet again, very poor, not at all dog-friendly nutritional balance. Along with tons of sugars and Sodium.

To give you some perspective, the maximum recommended daily intake of Sodium is 100mg for a medium-sized dog).

If your pup loves blueberry, why not feed him a healthy blueberry treat instead?   

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as of September 28, 2020 5:37 pm

My dog ate waffles with maple syrup. What should I do?

So your dog accidentally eats some maple syrup? Or you ended up surrender to his puppy eyes and have given him a couple of nibbles of hotcakes splashed in syrup?

First, check the syrup’s ingredients. Make sure there is no xylitol in the item. If it has some, look for veterinary advice as soon as possible.  

If your maple syrup is pure or there is no xylitol in it as a sugar substitute, the highest worry is the excessive amount of sugar intake. Too much of it sugar can disturb the pup’s belly, causing some pain and discomfort.

General advice would be watching your pet within the next 24-48 hours for any unusual signs. If you noticed any, it might make sense to call your vet as well. But most likely, your pup is going to be OK. 

Credits: thanks for the cover photo to Canva.

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