Can Dogs Eat Arugula? Is It Safe or It Can Be Toxic?

Arugula is a leafy green vegetable that has been described as having a spicy mustard peppery taste. It is often used in salads mixed with other types of greens but is also eaten steamed or sauteed. Arugula is native to the Mediterranean region, where it is a popular ingredient in many local cuisines. It’s proven to be healthy for humans, but can dogs eat it too? 

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Arugula Nutritional Benefits for Humans

Arugula has several nutritional benefits for humans. This leafy green vegetable is high in fiber and phytochemicals and low in sugar and carbohydrates. When eating arugula either raw or cooked, you should cut off the stems and remove any yellow leaves. 

Let’s talk facts here. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and their food database, 100g of arugula contains 24 calories, 2.35g of protein, 0.59g of fats, 3.53g of carbs, including 1.2 from the fiber. It also has 176mg of Calcium, 14.1mg of Vitamin C, and 2352 IU of Vitamin A.

And like other dark green leafy vegetables, arugula also contains Potassium, Folate (A form of vitamin B) as well as vitamin K too. Sounds pretty amazing. But how about our pets? Can they enjoy this leafy green also? 

Is Arugula Safe for Dogs To Eat?

Dogs enjoy eating a variety of different foods, just like humans do. In many cases, they can even enjoy some of the same foods we like to eat. While it isn’t safe to feed dogs all human foods, there are some foods that human foods that are safe for dogs in limited quantities, and arugula is one of those foods.

However, it is recommended that you only serve your dog this vegetable cooked since raw arugula is a goitrogenic (so may cause thyroid problems). 

Is Arugula Good For Dogs?

Arugula does contain vitamins and minerals that are indeed healthy for dogs. However, it would be best if you only served arugula that is cooked to your dogs and then only in small amounts and occasionally.

And as with any changes in your pet’s diet, it is best to consult your veterinarian before making any changes in your dog’s diet. 

Arugula, like any other food, may cause an allergic reaction in some dogs. So you should start by feeding your dog a bite or two and then wait for at least 48 hours. You have to watch and watching to see if your dog shows any signs that the pup may not be able to tolerate this vegetable.

Can Dogs Eat Baby Arugula?

Baby Arugula is nothing more than a young arugula that is a bit more tender and smaller than full-grown arugula. It contains the same vitamins and minerals and is safe for most dogs to eat in small amounts. 

However, like regular arugula, baby arugula should only be given to your dog once it is cooked. Fresh arugula in any form can disrupt the hormones that regulate a dog’s metabolism, which could severely affect your dog’s health. 

Can Dogs Eat Arugula? Summary

Healthy dogs can eat cooked arugula in small amounts when given as a treat. However, as with any changes in diet, you should first check with your veterinarian.

And then, after introducing your dog to this new food, you should watch him for at least 48 hours to ensure that he has no allergic reaction to this vegetable. 

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