What Are the Easiest Dogs to Housebreak?

Are you interested in a particular category of the easiest breeds to housebreak? Then use the table of contents below to jump to the most relevant section. And you can always go back by clicking on the black arrow in the right bottom corner of the page. Also, please note that some of the links in this article may be affiliate links. For more details, check the Disclosure section at the bottom of the page. 

How to housebreak a dog?

The most important part of potty training is care and supervision. 

 For the best results, you must follow the schedule. And observe your pup for signs that the pet is about to do his or her business. Older dogs generally might get what you want them to do right away. But still, they can also be confused by the process. Especially if they were living on the streets before.

Some pet owners, using the “Schedule+Observation” method, were able to potty train their pet within one week! (Which is so much faster comparing to an average, of 4-6 months required for potty training a puppy). Check the detailed schedule for the training and more tips on our guide “How to Housebreak an Older Dog.” 

How long does it take to housebreak a dog? 

Older dogs can be housebroken. The training process is the same as for the puppies. But adult dog’s previous experience and acquired behaviors are different. Your pet may have never been taught or may have placed into the new surroundings.

The golden rule is to be patient. Some pet owners, using the method mentioned above, reported that they were able to housebreak a dog within one week.  

Dogs that are easy to housebreak

There are thousands of dog breeds and some are a pure joy to teach. Certain breeds are considered the easiest precisely in potty training. Amongst those are cute Shiba Inus, along with tiny Shih Tzus, German Shepherds, and Miniature Schnauzer. Let’s cover each in detail.

The easiest medium-sized dog to potty train: Shiba Inu

Not only are Shiba Inu’s incredibly cute, but they are considered as one of the easiest dogs to housebreak. Since they have an inherent quality of cleanliness, Shiba Inus are easy to train and within a few days can be trained to go outside to do their business! However, their thick fur coat tends to shed a lot thus they have to be brushed regularly.

And sometimes it may take a while to train them in obedience. But rest assured, housetraining a Shiba Inu is a piece of cake since the dog itself is very cooperative.

Interested to learn the next steps of the training process? Shibas require work but if you SOCIALIZE them early on (doggie daycare (highly recommend this), dog parks, interact with people, etc) you will not have problems!! And here’s where this manual comes handy.

The easiest small dog to potty train: Shih Tzu

Another breed among the best dogs to housebreak and the breed that also made the list of the smartest small dogs is Shiz Tzu. On average, a Shih Tzu weighs in around 6 to 7 kilos.

They have a long coat which is prone to shedding hence most owners get their coat cropped very neatly so that constant grooming is not required; this is known as the ‘Puppy Cut’.

The Shih Tzu is incredibly friendly and affectionate. They are easy to train but require a lot of care as they are prone to falling ill due to breathing problems and other issues, that are fully covered in this guide.

Easiest large breed to potty train: German Shepherd

Known as very smart, eager to please, and fast-learners German Shepherds can pick up anything quite quickly. So the proper potty training of this breed generally expected to be a breeze.

Best dogs to housebreak of all:  Miniature Schnauzer

Even though they are called Miniature Schnauzer, they are bigger than Maltese dogs, weighing in on average around 4 to 8 kilos. The Miniature Schnauzer is amongst the small dogs that are very easy to housebreak. They have wiry fur which has to be maintained regularly otherwise it may become matted which is a painful experience for both the dog and owner.

While the Miniature Schnauzer might even be trained after it leaves the breeder’s house, if you change the method of its training from grass to pads, it might take the dog back to step one. Other than that, they are also incredibly receptive to obedience training and are friendly with everyone; from children to the elderly.

If you are looking into the possibility of making Miniature Schnauzer a part of your family you should research more with this manual: it covers a lot of information including what kinds of supplies needed, different health issues and, of course, training.

Difficult to potty train breed: Chihuahua

Chihuahuas have a reputation of being almost impossible to fully potty train. And it can be the truth in part. Let’s just make it clear – those pups are actually quite intelligent. The problem with potty training, in particular, is the size of these pups. They are tiny and so as their bladder.

That means they have to go potty much more often than any other breed. And if the owner gets upset with Chihuahua during the training process, the dog will sense irritation and become fearful and overall not very joyful about the whole potty training thing.

If Chihuahua will do something right though very cheerful and loud praises can be the same level scary and distractive. 

So in case of this particular breed, its all about finding the right balance in communicating with your pup. 

Credits: thanks for the cover photo to Canva.

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